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مشاهدة جميع الاصدارات : Hafiz Kamal



Najib
15-10-2005, 23:37
I open this section with two beautiful Gazels (Mawwal)

By Hafiz Kamal recorded in 1927

Hakem
11-03-2006, 10:47
I open this section with two beautiful Gazels (Mawwal)

By Hafiz Kamal recorded in 1927

I am trying to trace those two Gazals, I don't think they are from Gazeller 3. Can you remember which album they are from?

3amr
11-03-2006, 12:23
I don't think they're on the new album, these two gazels have been on the website of the turkish ministry of culture for a very long time.

In any case, everytime I listen to Hafiz Kemal, I start banging my head against the wall and saying: where did all the great singers go.

seriously, this guy is like the greatest voice I have ever heard.

take a look at this gazal, the huzzam treatment here is in my opinion more tarab than a human being is normally allowed to hear in one lifetime. it's from the bacanos CD on kalan I think, but I'm not sure, I got it from zeryab.

Hakem
11-03-2006, 12:56
WOW!
I see what you mean about the Tarab elements. Thanks a lot.

I see that this track 5 from Kalan's "Yorgo Bacanos 1900-1977". However, on the Kalan site it says that this track is 3:34 mins. While the one posted here is 3:57 can someone verify for the sake of documentation please.

AmbroseBierce
11-03-2006, 13:09
This is indeed a wonderful piece, thank you. I can understand your wish for banging your head...

For Turkey in particular, I think they dealt a big blow to their musical scene by introducing monoethnic nationalism - no more Yorgo Bacanos, no more Udi Hrant, no more Isak Al-Gazi possible.

3amr
11-03-2006, 13:11
You're more than welcome,

but in addition to the two previous gazels posted by Najib, that's pretty much all the Hafiz Kemal I have.

it's such a pitty, but I haven't seen any CD's devoted to him.

what really interestes me about him is two things, the complete perfection of all the ornaments what can even imagine hearing in turkish vocal music (particularly this really intense vocal pulse he does, sort of like a trill, but in volume not pitch). I have never heard a human voice doing this, at least not to such perfection.

also, he's one of the few singers of traditional eastern music that can produce his voice, and I mean "produce". I can never detect any sort of the pushing you usually get with oriental singers singing in the high register, for example, in the huzzam gazel, the man does an obescenely beautiful sort of slide from the tenor high C! down to the B in full voice. I mean, a high C cannot be pushed out by force, particularly not a high C that is so beautiful (with a touch of nasal head resonance in this case).
oh, and in the other gazel (hicaz I think), he touches a couple of short high D's for good measure.

sorry for the long post (I guess it's obvious how much I adore this guy)
Amr

3amr
11-03-2006, 13:27
if you're going to start talking about Isak al-Gazi, I would have to start banging my head again. (talk about a gorgeous voice).

as for the monoethnic nationalism, just consider where the arabs would have been were it not for the persians and the turks during the abbasid empire. (no avicenna, no algorithmi, no Farabi). same can be said about the ottoman empire, where would they have been without the armenians and the greeks (I won't include the arabs here, because, personally, I think that ever since the mongols invaded, we haven't quite gotten back on our feet).

I think turkey, armenia, greece, and the near east, both geographically and culturally, are more similar than any of them would care to admit. It's a pitty everybody's constantly bickering (all in the name of national pride), instead of being one united force.

Hakem
11-03-2006, 13:57
I can't agree with both you more! Yes the culture of Greece, Turkey, Armenia, and the Levant is tightly linked, and this diversity that now surprise us was common and normal to people then. It is because of ideologies of ethnic purities and few genocides that we are now fascinated by how those people were living and working together.

The mono-ethnic ideology of modern nationalism has been a plague to the multiethnic and diversity in the arts. Listening to this music allows one to discount the borders of those nation-states. It is interesting to note that one of the things that Greek and Turkish nationalism agreed upon was erasing the memory and diversity of the Ottoman culture and music; Maqam music was forbidden on Turkish radio!

Not only in the Ottoman lands, but also in Andalusia (which I am researching on the side), which was very rich till the proto-fascists expelled Arabs and Jews, and this richness is manifest in the arts! I have many Flamenco pieces, in which cantors are directly influenced of the Arabic improvisation tradition, and needless to say the Guitar being a "child" of the Andalusian Oud.

The important point here is that Ottoman lands inherited the cultural diversity of Andalusia, specially when it comes to the Jews, since many of them moved to Istanbul and Salonika. The good thing is that music is allowing us all to transcend those boundaries, as it has always did!

This was long, but it is a pressing concern! By the way, I have a full CD for Izak Algazi Efendi, if you don't have it, I can post some for you. The title is: Osmanlı-Türk ve Osmanlı-Yahudi Musıkisinin Büyük Sesi.

AmbroseBierce
11-03-2006, 13:58
I won't keep on about the political aspects - that's a complicated issue we could discuss (and lament) without end.

But I found one more Gazel by Hafiz Kemal on the Rounder Records album "Masters of Turkish Music Vol.2": "Nice gülcini" ("So many rose-gatherers") in Makam Segah, recorded in June 1928.

And to this I add another piece from the same CD, Eguine Havasi "Murad kenarinda" ("On the river bank") by Yeghiahzar Efendi, recorded in September 1927.

AmbroseBierce
11-03-2006, 14:07
It is interesting to note that one of the things that Greek and Turkish nationalism agreed upon was erasing the memory and diversity of the Ottoman culture and music; Maqam music was forbidden on Turkish radio!

At the same time, Greece "profited" from this - just look at the long-term influence of Rembetiko on Greek music, and - please correct me, if I'm wrong - this music originated in Istanbul.


Not only in the Ottoman lands, but also in Andalusia (which I am researching on the side), which was very rich till the proto-fascists expelled Arabs and Jews, and this richness is manifest in the arts! I have many Flamenco pieces, in which cantors are directly influenced of the Arabic improvisation tradition, and needless to say the Guitar being a "child" of the Andalusian Oud.

These influences are obvious and have left a deep and lasting impact on European music which up to the Baroque and the introduction of temperated tuning was basically an offshoot of Arabic-andalusian music (at least I see it as such), with of course many different other, minor influences, plus the tradition of Gregorian singing the importance of which I have not fully grasped yet.


By the way, I have a full CD for Izak Algazi Efendi, if you don't have it, I can post some for you. The title is: Osmanlı-Türk ve Osmanlı-Yahudi Musıkisinin Büyük Sesi.

Please do so, maybe in a thread exclusively devoted to this fantastic singer. If there's interest I can add pieces from the 2002 Wergo album "Cantor Isaac Algazi - Sweet Singer of Israel. Ottoman Jewish Music from the Early Twentieth Century".

3amr
11-03-2006, 14:34
I second the request about the Isak al-Gazi CD, the man's voice is so beautiful, it's painful to listen to.

the Yeghiahzar Efendi Piece is wonderful. lovely sort of open tenor voice, (makes me want to learn turkish, but that's not possible I think here in Lebanon, even if it were, I'm already learning german, singing in a choir, and I have official highschool exams this june, doesn't leave me much time does it?)

a small request on the side (sorry if it is an inconvenience), on the first of the rounder CD's, there's a piece sung by Yozgatli Hafiz Suleyman Bey . I'ld be grateful if anyone could post it.

AmbroseBierce
11-03-2006, 15:08
This request can be fulfilled easily - here is the music:

Najib
11-03-2006, 15:25
I'm joining this thread a bit late, sorry.

1st of Paul, what is the CD that you posted from you last file?

Hakem, I apologise if I misled, but the 1st Hafiz Kamal couple of files are from the 1st Gazeller records by Kalan.

and 3amr you are most welcome to this forum. Thanks for your lovely contributions.

Najib

3amr
11-03-2006, 15:46
thanks a great deal.

3amr

AmbroseBierce
11-03-2006, 15:46
Najib, that pice is from the Rounder Records album "Masters of Turkish Music, Vol.1".

AmbroseBierce
11-03-2006, 16:01
I don't think they're on the new album, these two gazels have been on the website of the turkish ministry of culture for a very long time.

These two gazels are still on the website mentioned by 3amr - the first is called "Asuman Ağlar", the second one "Şimşir-i Nigâhın". (http://www.kultur.gov.tr/portal/kultur_portal/medya/muzik/muzik_kulturu/osmanli/simsiri_nigahin.mp3)

Najib
13-03-2006, 13:55
Paul,

You will find that these Gazels are everywhere! Yes they are on the Rounder records, but they are also available on the wonderfull Kalan Gazeller records.

Cheers
Najib

AmbroseBierce
30-05-2006, 17:47
Again from Kalan's "Gazeller II": two more gazels and one sarki by the fantastic Hafiz Kemal. The first (Hasretle bu seb) was recorded in 1927, the two Isfahan pieces probably in 1929-30.

Unfortunately the texts on the individual pieces are in Turkish only. Still I found the name of a certain Laika Hanim in connection with the Ussak Gazel, and it seems Yorgo Bacanos is playing in the Isfahan Gazel. The Sarki is written by Dellalzade Ismail Efendi.

3amr
30-05-2006, 20:37
I don't know how to thank you for these amazing treasures.

I can never adequately express my admiration for this guy's voice and technique, truly magnificent. (my favourite turkish vocalist of all time).

a little remark on the mastering though,

The isfahan gazel seems to be running a bit fast judging by hafiz kemal's voice, and did anybody feel that they did a bit too much filtering? I mean, an electrical record from the thirties is quite listenable without any filtering in the first place.

AmbroseBierce
30-05-2006, 23:22
3amr, since you are such a fan of Hafiz Kemal (I am too), here is one more Gazel from the same album. You just have to promise that you refrain from banging your head against the wall ;)

Again "Yorgo" is mentioned in the Turkish text of which I don't understand a word unfortunately.

3amr
31-05-2006, 12:18
hehe, don't worry, my head is to be left alone for the mean time, although, I am having a bit of a field day :D. (my physics test didn't go too well today, so this really brightened my mood).

thanks thanks thanks thanks thanks.

(oh, and I can't help thinking of these gazels as a mini-makam-lesson each, it's like Hafiz Kemal is saying, listen now, neva should go here, then you do this, and then it must go down to here.....)