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مشاهدة جميع الاصدارات : ياظالمني 23 يوليو 1954



7abib
15-03-2007, 01:16
هذه الحفلة من أجمل الحفلات اللي سمعتها لأغنية ياظالمني وبصراحة ابدعت أم كلثوم في هذه الاغنيه في كثير من الحفلات. قفلات ام كلثوم في هذه الحفله رائعه مثلا عند الدقيقة 49 . وارتجالات جميلة عند الدقيقة 52
تاريخ هذه الحفل 23-يوليو 1954
والمكان نادي ظباط القوات المسلحة

luay
15-03-2007, 02:10
Thank you very much Habib.
I'm listening now, and in an absolute state of ecstasy thanks to Om Kulthoum's voice and the
beautiful stuff made by Qassabji and Abdu Saleh (mainly) throughout.
It's an interesting sort of "temporal juxtaposition", so to speak, of this recording and that of Seerti-l-Hobb yesterday. I don't know if it's the 11-years difference in Om Kulthoum's voice, or the 11 million light years difference in the quality of lyrics/music between the two songs that shows beyond any doubt two completely different Om Kulthoum's.
I'm listening and enjoying now, and have already noted down a few special moments, which I'll share once I'm done listening.

Thanks very much for this beautiful concert.
Luay

أبو علاء
15-03-2007, 02:33
شكرا جزيلا للأخ الكريم على هذا التّسجيل الّذي بشّرنا لؤيّ (والفريد) بقيمته وإن كنت لم أستمع إليه بعد ولن يمكنني ذلك قبل الغد، وها أنت قد استطعت رفع الملفّ وفتح موضوع جديد والحمد للّه، ونعم الملفّ والموضوع.
في انتظار الاستماع لي رجاء وحيد وأرجو مراعاته مثل سائر الأعضاء وهو أن تكتب أسماء ملفّاتك القادمة بالحروف اللاّتينيّة لا العربيّة لأسباب تقنيّة بحتة سبق لي شرحها عدّة مرّات.

luay
15-03-2007, 03:06
Abu A'laa,
I don't want you to have too high expectations, just in case you don't find much in it. I personally loved it, but to me, still, I haven't heard any version of this song in the quality
of the Damascus' one.
Fred made a comment that the musicians' performance reminds of the takht; I think you gentlemen are much more qualified to comment on that (although I think I understand what
he's talking about).

Luay

fredlag@noos.fr
15-03-2007, 21:22
@ Lu'ay & Habib :
This is indeed a wonderful concert, and UK's voice in it is at its peak. The most impressive part, for me, is after 1:02:17, the second "haket lak" series, and the incredible departure in extreme high tones around 1:03:30 with a wonderful bayyati improvised section. The very cutting of "we ban / len-nas / dana ruhi" (1:04:41 >1:04:52) is almost Abd al-Hayy Hilmiesque. This is a true oasis of classical Arab music in the middle of the 50s. From 1:06:00 on, Muhammad Abduh Salih on the qanun is taking the lead and does most of the accompaniment, which makes this instant close to a Nahda school mawwal, before the orchestra starts again. And then again the same wonder around 1:15:00... An excellent example of creative reformulation of her own higazkar improvised descent at 1:15:55 >1:16:05 creatively repeated and enhanced at 1:16:07 > 1:16:17, stopped mid-way, qanun translation : this is, in my perception, Arabian art music, not a hybrid form as is usual with UK...
I must say how mudh grateful I am to the Forum, not only for the musical enjoyment I derive from it, but also for making me understand a few things that were not so obvious before I had at my disposal such a huge amount of UK concerts of the 50s at hand ; I had a lot of trouble understanding why Egyptian / Arab musicology failed to see that music from the mid-1930s on is not an evolution from takht nahda-like aesthetics, but a frank rupture. After listening to such versions of Ya Zalemni, of Salu ku'us al-Tila, of Ahl el-hawa with incredible bastanikar layali, and so on, it appears that since UK's concerts conciled the "modernist" trends that had been winning in the 1930s, with "old school" moments of tarab, her very presence and her art "obscured" the obvious shift that had taken place, and made the audience think that what was happening in the musical field was merely tatwir. But when someone only knows Umm Kulthum through Sono Cairo concerts and no more than a dozen "alternative" versions, which was my case until recently, this continuity is impossible to perceive. Which is, paradoxically, better : for UK seems a complete exception, in the middle of the 20th century. A remnant. So here comes the most puzzling question : how could she be at the same time the last remnant of a dying art, the very murderer of this art, and the most popular artist of her time, the ultimate reference ?

luay
15-03-2007, 22:45
Thanks Fred for your truly enlightening comments. I agree with your assessment of the best parts. I had to write a "disclaimer" about my opinion about this version, because I remembered immediately that once I raved about one recording of El-Amal, and Abu A'laa had a completely opposite reaction to it.

Many of us, myself included, are learning so much from your comments. I'm not trying to be humble or any of that. To give a concrete example of what I mean: with your vast knowledge, you can relate some performance in the mid 50's to one by Abd El Hayy Hilmi a few decades before. With my narrow interests, that are almost Om Kulthoum exclusive, I can't make such comparisons, ties, etc.

About the paradox you raised at the end of your comments, I think OK's voice and the quality of music produced in the later years, may help shed the light on answering it, but I don't know for sure.

Luay

7abib
15-03-2007, 23:25
بصراحة أشكرك لأنك جعلتني أدقق اكثر في الأغنية. وأحييك على التعليق

luay
15-03-2007, 23:28
I forgot to add one more thing that touches upon a point you made. I recall in one discussion with Abu A'laa he said that he used to not care about "obtaining" or "collecting" different performances of the same song. In the case of some singers that may be a safe/ok thing to do, but in the case of Om Kulthoum, I think I can say without exaggeration that what we've heard in the commercial versions is almost nothing compared to what we're hearing from her other performances (and who knows what she used to do in the 20', 30's and 40's). And of all songs, I think Ya Dhalimni is a great example. I like the commercial version, and I'm used to the song based on that version, but the commercial version is absolutely nothing compared to the performances that we're hearing of this very song. I think even Abu A'laa is not mad anymore that there are 26 recordings of this song :-)

Finally, I think this is a point that you, Fred, would be most qualified to confirm or discredit: One of Om Kulthoum's greatest contributions was that through her performances, the real live performances, with improvisations, etc., lived for a few more decades. I don't know who else was there that contributed at all to live performances with such extensive improvisations.

Luay

أبو علاء
15-03-2007, 23:38
Unfortunately, I cant join in this discussion since I haven't listened yet to this new event and we're less than half an hour away from the 'aghani daily appointement from which there's no respite since Mr Lagrange has assigned me on permanent duty whatever concert they broadcast including such niceties as el-hubbi kulluh, 'alfi lilah, 'amal hayati and the like.....
Allah yisamhak ya Farid!:)

Alafandi
15-03-2007, 23:39
هذه الحفلة من أجمل الحفلات اللي سمعتها لأغنية ياظالمني وبصراحة ابدعت أم كلثوم في هذه الاغنيه في كثير من الحفلات. قفلات ام كلثوم في هذه الحفله رائعه مثلا عند الدقيقة 49 . وارتجالات جميلة عند الدقيقة 52
تاريخ هذه الحفل 23-يوليو 1954
والمكان نادي ظباط القوات المسلحة
مشكور أخي حبيب
أربعة أشهر بعد نادي الظباط, غنت ام كلثوم في الريفولي يا ظالمني...و لكن تحفتك أبدع و أكتر عاطفيه...و ألإتنين مناح و طيبين...ـ
تحياتي

أبو الغيث
15-03-2007, 23:46
since Mr Lagrange has assigned me on permanent duty whatever concert they broadcast including such niceties as el-hubbi kulluh, 'alfi lilah, 'amal hayati and the like.....
Allah yisamhak ya Farid!:)


الله يخليلنا ياك يا فريد باشا :D

أبو علاء
16-03-2007, 01:45
This is fantastic indeed! The mood of the musicians was so special in that performance. They seem totally undisciplined (Don't worry, Fred, for your premiere, the recording is going on!). The tone is already given through an incredible inflection in the first cadence (ya dhalimni) in the inaugural section (I can't mention the exact time now). Some nice improvisations particularly in the second rendition of suburti snin as well as in 'atawi'. But, what she does in wiyizdadi-l-gawa biya around min 52 is unbelievable. It's a shear miracle for a human voice!
The obsessive hakitlak series around the hour is perfectly "helmiesque" to use Fred's terminology.
Amazing, the variation on the tonic (stressed syllable) in hakitlak in min 66: hákitlak/hakilák.
Again incredible variations on rahamni-l-li firih fiya min 76 and what a way to say nuhi in the wake thereof! Not only Manyalawi is capable of such vocal simulation as the now well known one in el-bublbul gani.
To sum up, we have now two outstanding versions of 'ahli-l-hawa and three to four ones of ya dhalimni.

luay
16-03-2007, 06:05
[LEFT]The tone is already given through an incredible inflection in the first cadence (ya dhalimni) in the inaugural section (I can't mention the exact time now).

I think you mean the Ya Dhalimni at minute 6 and 50 seconds, if I'm not mistaken. It killed me when I heard it. And of course, it killed the audience, since they stopped The Lady immediately.


But, what she does in wiyizdadi-l-gawa biya around min 52 is unbelievable. It's a shear miracle for a human voice!

To be more precise, it's the stuff at minute 52 and 53 seconds. She seems to me to change a maqam at minute 53 and 10 seconds; am I right (or still haven't got what a maqam is)?


Again incredible variations on rahamni-l-li firih fiya min 76 and what a way to say nuhi in the wake thereof! Not only Manyalawi is capable of such vocal simulation as the now well known one in el-bublbul gani.[/SIZE]

As I said, to me the Damascus version remains the best (so far) overall, but the variations on Rahamni Illi Firih Fiyya in this one is the best of all that we've heard so far. Particularly what she does at minute 76 and 30 seconds; A*M*A*Z*I*N*G creativity and imagination, to say the least.

Luay

Burhan
16-03-2007, 17:53
... Which is, paradoxically, better : for UK seems a complete exception, in the middle of the 20th century. A remnant. So here comes the most puzzling question : how could she be at the same time the last remnant of a dying art, the very murderer of this art, and the most popular artist of her time, the ultimate reference ?

this is a very interesting issue....

the 'death' and interruption u r refering to seem to have taken place gradually and in two major milestones....the first was in the second half of the 30's when UK decided not to perform the goodies of Abul 3ila and Hosni....
the second happened at a much larger scale in the begining of the 60's when she again decided not to perform the goodies of Zakaria and Sunbati of the 40's and early 50's and gradually replaced them with the works of baligh and wahhab.....

وكما تقول القصيدة...ان كنت تقصد قتلي ، قتلتني مرتين ...وكل هذا وهي.... واثقة الخطوة تمشي ملكة

just a point of view....

luay
16-03-2007, 18:24
Burhan,
About the "second murder" (I hate to use such term in the context of Om Kulthoum's contribution to Arabic singing and music in general, but since I'm responding, I have to
use it), Om Kulthoum's voice wouldn't have enabled her to sing the 40's songs in the 60's
Her voice faltered at several places, for example, when she sang Salou Qalbi in 1968. So,
can you imagine what would've happened had she sung something like Raqq El Habib, Gholobt Asaleh, or El Awwela Fel Gharam in 1968?

Best,
Luay

awadallaradwan
17-03-2007, 02:35
Thank you habeeb
Iam listening now , this is extra ordinary

luay
26-05-2009, 07:13
My listening for tonight includes this masterpiece of a performance. I believe we have here a clear example that attests to the lady's generosity when it comes to singing and giving her utmost to her audience (much has been written about her with speculations about her being stingy in her life; but why do people care about the personal life of an artist? Thank God there was no Twitter in those days for Om Kulthoum to spam her fans with details of her personal life :-)
Notice how she starts singing Atawea', and following the audience request she goes back to Sobort Sneen.

Youm at 36:29 is so beautiful and arousing. Following that is some of the most beautiful stuff on Sobort Sneen that she'd done in this song.

Her way of singing W-Yezdad starting at 52:35 is very beautiful, particularly the moving stuff at 53:07.

As for Haketlak, she did very beautiful stuff, and Fred described it very well.

I want to raise a point here that is not about tastes but rather about style. On multiple occasions, Abu A'laa indicated his judgment of this song that it's of (much?) lesser quality than other Sunbati compositions like Gaddedte Hobbak Leh, Ya Toul A'dhabi, etc. But I find this song in fact to be great in the sense that Sunbati composed it in such a way that allowed for much improvisation (and no wonder the lady improvised in almost every performance of it): Sobort Sneen, W-Yezdad El Gawa Beyya (and allowing her to improvise on Atawea'), and the entire Haketlak stanza. In fact, I find Ya Dhalimni to allow more improvisations than Gaddedte Hobbak Leh for example (although Abu A'laa and I are in complete agreement on the "divinity" of the latter composition).

PS I love Rami's verse "Ba'aa-l-A'dhel Yedoua' Kasi, W-Albak Ya Daneen A'si"; I think it's the summary of Ya Dhalimni.

PPS No comments from Alfred yet; Alfred: you're missing a great performance, or you've listened but speechless ;)

Luay

alffy74
26-05-2009, 22:37
It seems I can't delete my own messages:)

alffy74
26-05-2009, 22:40
PPS No comments from Alfred yet; Alfred: you're missing a great performance, or you've listened but speechless ;)

Luay

Luay for God's sake (uhmmm), what do you expect me to add to what Fred, Abu 'Ala and yourself have said?

I have just finished re-listening to this performance (this is probably my 7th or 8th time since I downloaded it), and when I put down the times of the part I liked and compared them to what you guys have discussed, I found that they are the same I don't want to sound redundant, and I'm no position to comment on maqams and ajnas. But I would like to emphasize that the climaxes (cause, unusally, there are several) of this particular performance, in my personal opinion, are between 52'42 and 53'01, where her vibratto of the word 'yizdad', in addition to being vocally wonderful, perfectly conveys the meaning of 'adding' the intensity of her feelings.

Then comes the part between 62' and 67', particularly between 64'58" and 65'12" where UK takes her audience and us on rocket journey. And it's not about vocal prowess alone...it's about intense freelings. How could she after a lengthy performance reach such high notes at 50 years of age (at least)? Then the incredible stuff at 65'55" to 66'18" followed by a masterful and creative Abdo Saleh. I am not familiar with Nahda music, but if this is a version of it, what a desolation that we lost such an art!
Although the whole performance is amazing, I believe the highlight goes to this last section . Umm Kulthum will never stop to amaze me with her agility in shifting between her lower and upper register in a matter of seconds. I believe that even if we only had her performances of 1954-1956, they would be enough to show us what a great artist she was. Almost all her available outstanding performances are within these 3 years.

Final comment on Ya dhalemni vs Gaddet Hobbak. In my humble opinion, these 2 songs reflect some kind of artsitic schizophrenia in the personality of Sumbati. In less stringent terms, they show his versatility. He can compose a masterpiece of a song that needs no improvisations, such as Gaddet Hobbak, and make people sigh and swing, or he can make a relatively common song, like ya dhalmeni, allow the singer to display her musical and vocal talents, and still make the song one of the most popular hits of the 20th century. Having said that, I believe ya dhalemni has its own wonderful moments that do not rely on Umm Kulthum, such as the chorus with its amazing percussions that can be repeated with different lyrics, the extreme sadness of "w yizdad el gawa biya" and the tempo of "w ban lel nass dana rou7i", which is my favorite part.

أبو علاء
26-05-2009, 23:00
I want to raise a point here that is not about tastes but rather about style. On multiple occasions, Abu A'laa indicated his judgment of this song that it's of (much?) lesser quality than other Sunbati compositions like Gaddedte Hobbak Leh, Ya Toul A'dhabi, etc. But I find this song in fact to be great in the sense that Sunbati composed it in such a way that allowed for much improvisation (and no wonder the lady improvised in almost every performance of it): Sobort Sneen, W-Yezdad El Gawa Beyya (and allowing her to improvise on Atawea'), and the entire Haketlak stanza. In fact, I find Ya Dhalimni to allow more improvisations than Gaddedte Hobbak Leh for example (although Abu A'laa and I are in complete agreement on the "divinity" of the latter composition).

First, yes I do see a significant difference between this song and such other titles as ghulubt asalih, ya tul 'adhabi, hallit layali-l-qamar, gaddidti hubbak and sahran liwahdi at least from two points of view. But, first, it's worth noting that unlike the two first mentioned titles, which wer based on the monologue pattern (basically a more elaborate form), ya dhalimni is a taqtuqa-like composition (made of three "verses" separated by a recurrent "chorus"), which remains a relatively simple construction even though it is relatively more elaborate than the original model. This said, the difference I'm talking about can be seen on two different levels: melodic content and melody quality on the one hand and comparability on the other one. To explicit the latter, you can easily find other titles in Sunbati's repertoire which easily compare to ya dhalimni, the most obvious example being ya nasini, but the same is not true for any of the titles I mentioned.
Now, there is another idea in your appraisal of ya dhalimni that I would like to discuss and that is the fact "Sunbati composed it in such a way that allowed for much improvisation". I've become very skeptical about this kind of assertions not only concerning this song in particular but with regard to any other song. I hardly can see how a composer make a compostion more or less suitable for improvisation. As far as I can see, the only token available to a composer to favour improvisation is to include sections devoid of rythm (mursal) like suburti-snin or hakitlak. Apart from that, all credit for any improvisation would be entirely owed to the performer and improvisation is there whenever the latter is able and willing to improvise. The most beautiful (and extensive) improvisations we ever heard from the Lady were in 'ahli-l-hawa ya lil where no single mursal spot can be found and in el-'awwila fi-l-gharam which does contain a mursal section (the initial one) but the impressive improvisation is contained in the rythmic (bigger) part of the song and not in the initial one!! I could mention other examples (the second section of habibi yis'id 'awqatuh...) but I will add only a couple of them in the form of a question. Before you hear the 1944 nadi 'ahli concert and the small bit of ifrah ya qalbi that has recently surfaced in some other forums, did you ever imagine such extensive colourfoul impros were possible in those two compositions? I didn't, especially in such a brief straightforward sentence as the one in ifrah ya qalbi (ghannilu 'alhani-l-gharam)!!! Actually, the only comparable instance I can think of is ya-hliwa ya msallini as interpreted by Muhammad Salim El-'aguz. Listening to it was an incommensurate revelation after years of Sabah Fakhri and Makkawi...

alffy74
26-05-2009, 23:41
[SIZE=3]Now, there is another idea in your appraisal of ya dhalimni that I would like to discuss and that is the fact "Sunbati composed it in such a way that allowed for much improvisation". I've become very skeptical about this kind of assertions not only concerning this song in particular but with regard to any other song. I hardly can see how a composer make a compostion more or less suitable for improvisation. As far as I can see, the only token available to a composer to favour improvisation is to include sections devoid of rythm (mursal) like suburti-snin or hakitlak. Apart from that, all credit for any improvisation would be entirely owed to the performer and improvisation is there whenever the latter is able and willing to improvise.


Interesting point Abu 'Ala'. But we also see UK singing mursal impros in otherwise rhytmic compositions, such as 'atawa3 fi hawak'. It is rhytmic line, but all except 6 May 1954 improvisations are mursal!

Also why do we see Umm Kulthum more amenable to improvisations in Zakariyya's songs compared to Sumbati's? Is it because she felt that Sumbati provided enough embelishment to the melody that she didn't need to? As you said, there is a commonly held view that the composer could tie the singer to the original melody, something many credited to Abd el Wahab's approach with Umm Kulthum.

أبو علاء
27-05-2009, 00:09
But we also see UK singing mursal impros in otherwise rhytmic compositions, such as 'atawa3 fi hawak'. It is rhytmic line, but all except 6 May 1954 improvisations are mursal!

Of course you're right and this nullifies (or at least minimizes) the importance of this sole possibility available to the composer to allure the singer into improvisation.



Also why do we see Umm Kulthum more amenable to improvisations in Zakariyya's songs compared to Sumbati's? Is it because she felt that Sumbati provided enough embelishment to the melody that she didn't need to?
I would rather understand it as a greater responsiveness on the part of 'um kalthum to Zakariya's music than to Sunbati. In other words, Zakariya offered her the kind of music she liked whereas Sunbati provided a music that her public liked and 'um kalthum was both an authentic artist (an aesthetician) and a "trader" and she had to satisfy both in her person and concile them by striking the right balance.

luay
27-05-2009, 04:21
I see your point Abu A'laa. But here's mine :-)
Let's take Ahli-l-hawa for example. The lady improvised always in Nas Min Oloubha (which is not mursal, but the rhythm is really inspiring for improvisations) and in the opening line of Ahli-l-hawa ya lil fatou madagea'hom, in which the music and rhythm are extremely slow (sorry for the non-technical language :-) to begin with. On the other hand, could she improvise in Wey-Assarouk Ya lil A'la Hana W Sroor, which is the faster rhythm?

Now, I didn't say the mursal part is a *necessary* condition for improvisations, but I'd say that in most cases it's a *sufficient* condition. In Shamsi-l-Asil she always improvised in Ana W HAbibi Ya Nil Ghaybin A'ni-l-Wugdan, for example. In Lessa Faker, she improvised in Wellayali. In Aaollak Eih, she improvised in Hawak Howwa-Lli Khalla-l-Omri Ghali. In Fakkarouni she improvised in Elli Fat Wayyak. and the list goes on and on for improvisations in mursal parts. Mursal is really a mawwal in the middle of the song, if I may so, and what's a mawwal without improvisations?

So, my claim is not that mursal is needed for improvisation, but if it's present, an improvisation from Om Kulthoum almost always followed. Now, did the composer put a mursal part so that the lady improvises or did it have to do with the context, that's a question too big for me to answer :-)

Best,
Luay

alffy74
27-05-2009, 16:33
My question would be: why are mursal improvisations more common than metric improvisations, at least in UK's songs? Is it because metric improvisations require more skills, more understanding of metric rules, and/or more synchronisation between the singer and the musicians, especially the percussionist. Somebody once told me that one of UK's weaknesses was that she couldn't follow the 'iqa3' properly and that her skills in syncopes were poor. Although I know what syncope is, I really don't know whether this skill is necessary or embellishing to Arabic singing, or whether the claim about UK is right.
All I know is that the few metric improvisations that cross my mind now, such as those of el Awwila, ifrah ya qalbi (studio performance), and ayyouha essahirou (atlal kuwait 1968), are very masterful.

Alfred

أبو علاء
27-05-2009, 18:54
My question would be: why are mursal improvisations more common than metric improvisations, at least in UK's songs? Is it because metric improvisations require more skills, more understanding of metric rules, and/or more synchronisation between the singer and the musicians, especially the percussionist.
Well, as a general rule, rythm is a constraint be it for a singer or for a musician and it becomes all the more stringent when either of them wants to improvise. That's why rythmic improvisations are considered "nobler" and are seen as a proof of (and they definitely do require) greater skills (Fred, for instance, has always been more enthousiastic whenever he has come through rythmic impros in the Lady's performances).


Somebody once told me that one of UK's weaknesses was that she couldn't follow the 'iqa3' properly
This is true to a certain extent, hence her famous say in praising her percussionist 'ibrahm 'afifi ("... biyusturni" = he conceals my failures). However, rather than a lack of skilfullness, which I can hardly believe in the case of such a seasoned classical interpreter as kalthum, think it's more of pure music i.e melody getting over anything else, including rythm. I'm reminded here of an illustrious example of "carelessness" about rythm in the person of 'abdi-l-hay Hilmi.

Najib
27-05-2009, 21:54
You have reminded me of an old post of mine. I managed to anger Fred with it when I discovered that Aba Haggag was out of rhythm.

Of course Fred's input was all about the estethics of the singing itself and how difficult it is to mimick such virtuosity.

http://zamanalwasl.net/forums/showpost.php?p=7373&postcount=17

ok, you can call me pedantic!

alffy74
28-05-2009, 01:29
Thank you both for your input. This makes complete sense. I guess Umm Kulthum and other great Arab singers who were creative in their singing relied mostly on their fusion with the melody, which in turn dictated their rendition, even if they had to break the rhythm. This rejection of constraints might also explain, in part, why Umm Kulthum and her musicians never followed musical notes.

Alfred

أبو علاء
28-05-2009, 09:29
This rejection of constraints might also explain, in part, why Umm Kulthum and her musicians never followed musical notes.

Above all, this is linked to the very nature of Arab music, Alfred, and not an unusual attitude. It's the other way round - using such scores would have been odd in their context.

alffy74
28-05-2009, 15:03
I realize this Abu 'Ala' as the musical notes were not introduced into Arabic music until the 20th century, if i'm not mistaken. Although other singers contemporary to Umm Kulthum might have done the same, I find it particularly awesome that the most popular singer of the her times defied this constraint even in her later songs by Abd el Wahab and Baligh, whose compositions to Abd el Halim for example, were performed under the conduction of a maestro.

Alfred

shamuelie
18-06-2009, 07:41
Hi all... ok first post now. thanks for this amazing performance!

This is just remarkable how much there is an appealing to the emotions in this performance.
listen to 65:17 where she's emphasizing on what she really feels.

But I would like to ad, just like many did already, and give credit to ustad Abdo Saleh. What he does at 67'40" is just off the book and that's what makes it a unique!

He's there and he makes sure she feels it, together they are transporting us all to another level at 62:43!!!

Generally speaking between 65'48" to 67'.... he's just there and ecstases her (ytribha) and us!

thank you again