PDA

مشاهدة جميع الاصدارات : Welcome!



أبو علاء
11-02-2009, 01:35
To our most recent member, Mr Alvaro Martinez Leon who is a Spanish composer living in Paris. Mr Leon has written a quite interesting memoir on Arabi music in Spanish (check here (http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showthread.php?p=27504#post27504)). Welcome onboard!

alvaromartinez
21-02-2009, 23:01
I really want to thank you for your welcome in your forum. I've looking at some of the threads and downloading mp3 and I must say I'm really delighted of all the information accesible and quite scared of my little knowledge in the subject!

My question is about the term "el wasla". I'm working in an arrangement of "Ya racha el Fetene", the inqilab from the Nuba Zidan (Algerian repertoire). In the lyrics I found the word "el wasla" referring to love union and after I found that in Egyptian repertoire, Wasla is the term equivalent to Nuba in Andalusian repertoire, referring to union between musical sections. Are both meanings correct? Are there more definitions referring to musical or poetic terms? It seems the subject of frustrated love union (el-wasla...) is quite present on the lyrics of this tradition, how true is this?

I guess it's quite a very-beginner's question, but this forum is the best place I found to throw light on my fragmentary information about oriental music.

A great thank you again

أبو علاء
21-02-2009, 23:40
Unfortunately, I'm not at all acquainted with the Algerian maluf as it goes for the various Maghrebine repertoirs in general (except for very limited knowledge of the Tunisian one). However, I suppose that all of them use that sort of low level literary Arabic comparable to the one in the text of 'alf laylah walayalah ('The Arabian Nights"). I doubt the meaning of the word waslah (the final "h" standing for a "final ta'") has anything to do with love or lovers' union. Are you sure it is not simply al-wasla (without "h" or "t") i.e the "accusative" form (mansub) of the masculine noun? I'm not at all sure you need what follows - you probably know it already very well. But, generally speaking, the root wsl denotes the notion of continuum and junction as opposed to fsl that means discontinuity and break/separation. Morphologically, the pattern fa'lah corresponds to "'ism marrah". In other words, it designates a single occurence/materialization of the generic meaning converyed by the verb. The musical term designates a suite composed of several elements organized in a definite order and that normally should not be dissociated. The Arabic lexicons webpage has been down for the last few days. As soon as it is back online, I'll have a look at the whole entry in the lisan and taji-l-'arus and I'll get back to you if I find any relevant information there. Sorry for my bad English.

أبو علاء
22-02-2009, 00:25
In the meantime, here's the content of the entry "wsl" in Lane's Arabic-English Lexcion. I suggest you use the 200% to read this pdf file.

alvaromartinez
22-02-2009, 15:12
The word is al-wasla, I didn't add an "h" at the end of the word. I think it's now very clear after your explanation and the lexicon reference you sent. I must learn Arab!
By the way, what literature from the Nahda (or other instead of alf laylah walaylah) would you recommend me?
And where could I find translation from lyrics of Wasla?

Thanks a lot and congratulations for your English

أبو علاء
22-02-2009, 16:09
The word is al-wasla, I didn't add an "h" at the end of the word. I think it's now very clear after your explanation and the lexicon reference you sent. I must learn Arab!


Sorry, very often people, including Arabists like our friend and eminent scholar Frédéric, tend to omit the h that stands for the final t in singular feminine nouns when transcribing them into latin characters. Since you referred to the wasla as a quasi equivalent of the nubah, I assumed that's what you meant. And I didn't know you don't speak Arabic.
So, obviously, what is meant here is al-wasl, the noun derived from the root wsl. By the way, wisal is frequently used as a synonym to wasl, although originally, the morphological pattern of fi'al is often associated with the verbal pattern fa'ala (the first a is a long vowel), which implies association/sharing in (it also connotes a notion of duration and effort). I'm adding this because I know you are particularly interested in this term/conept in 'um kalthum's songs.



By the way, what literature from the Nahda (or other instead of alf laylah walaylah) would you recommend me?
And where could I find translation from lyrics of Wasla?
h

These are difficult questions to answer. Starting from the latter, There are extensive translations of the lyrics of various components of the classical Egyptian waslas (mawwals, dors, qasidas, maybe muwashshahs) in Frédéric Lagrange's thesis (in French) as well as in the booklets he wrote for some titles in the CDA series of compact disks dedicated to the classical repertoire (both in French and in English). See the studies and articles section! Fred could provide further information on other sources.
As for the other question, it depends on you want to read. For good French translations of works from different periods (both contemporary and classical), check the catalogue of Actes Sud publishers. I'm afraid I can't help concerning translations into English. By the way, Nights are not at all representative of Arab literature. They rather belong to medieval folklore and the language used therein is a mix of low level litereary and spoken Arabic.

أبو علاء
23-02-2009, 22:47
By the way, what literature from the Nahda (or other instead of alf laylah walaylah) would you recommend me?






A friend drew my attention today to this website (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/index.htm) that contains English translations of various Arab texts among which some literary works can be found. The following are worth mentioning. I don't know the translations in question and I can't say how good they are, even though they seem all to have been written by prominent orientalist scholars:

Qur'an

The Qur'an is the primary text of Islam, revealed to the Prophet Muhammed beginning in the year 610 C.E. It was canonicalized between 644 and 656. The Qur'an is required reading for anyone who wants to understand Islam. Qur'an means "The Recital" in Arabic; according to the story, the angel Gabriel commanded Muhammed to "Recite!".
[/URL] Hypertext Qur'an (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/index.htm#)
This page links together all of the Qur'an versions at this site.
The Qur’ân, Part I (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/sbe06/index.htm)
tr. by E.H. Palmer [1880] (Sacred Books of the East, vol. 6)
This is a completely new etext of the first volume of the Palmer Quran traslation, with full introduction and footnotes.
The Qur’ân, Part II (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/index.htm#)
tr. by E.H. Palmer [1880] (Sacred Books of the East, vol. 9)
A completely new etext of the second volume of the Palmer Quran translation, with full footnotes and the text of the index for Part I and Part II.
The Koran (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/index.htm#)
translated by J.M. Rodwell [1876]
Another major Quran translation from the 19th century.
[URL="http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/pick/index.htm"]The Qur'an (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/index.htm#)
by Mohammed Marmaduke Pickthall (1875-1936) [1930]
A modern and sympathetic English rendering of the Quran.

Other Books

The Diwan of Abu'l-Ala (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/daa/index.htm)
tr. by Henry Baerlein [1911]
A delighful selection of poems by a 10th century Syrian rationalist philosopher.
Arabian Poetry (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/arp/index.htm)
by W. A. Clouston [1881]
Rare 19th century translations of Arabian poetry, mostly pre-Islamic or contemporary with Muhammed. Includes the Hanged Poems, and a synopsis of the Antar Saga.
The Maqámát of Badí‘ al-Zamán al-Hamadhání (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/mhm/index.htm)
translated by W.J. Prendergast [1915]
A masterpiece of medieval Islamic literature.
The Hanged Poems (http://www.sacred-texts.com/isl/hanged/index.htm)
Translated by F.E. Johnson and Sheikh Faiz-ullah-bhai [1917]
Translations of the earliest (pre-Islamic) Arabic poetry known, poems originally displayed ("hanged") in the Kaaba, the holiest shrine of Mecca.

alvaromartinez
24-02-2009, 02:01
Well, I thank you enormously...entering this world will take me a long time, but it's really worth it!