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مشاهدة جميع الاصدارات : Taqsim Fawzi Sayeb



Franck Leriche
30-06-2011, 06:46
First, i'd like to thanks for the membership on this beautiful forum!

I would like to share some recordings i made around 1982 from a broadcast concert of the late Fawzi Sayeb.


That's the concert that lead me to play the oud.

Fawzi Sayeb is still, in my opinion, one of the most fantastic player i've ever heard.
Even if is technique is not perfect, the spirit of his music is so high.

He is from Tunisian origin.

A friend told me that during the 80' when Iranian târ player Dariush Talâi came to live in Paris, they used to spend nights playing taqasim and discussing about makams they've play for hours and hours.

I was so impressed by him as a teenager, i could never approach him although he was present at every traditionnal music concert.

أبو علاء
30-06-2011, 19:49
Fawzi Sayeb is still, in my opinion, one of the most fantastic player i've ever heard.
Even if is technique is not perfect, the spirit of his music is so high.
Although I heard the name on a couple of occasions, sometimes with similar praising, I confess this is the first time ever I hear this musician. Now, subjective considerations that make us appreciate a performer, bet it a vocalist or an instrumentalist, and dislike another one, set aside, I have to say I wan't impressed at all by his play. Much more important than the technique that is not perfect (there are enough perfect technicians or, should I sy, "technicists" so that one doesn't have to worry much on that side), my main problem is precisely with the music itself. There's almost no substance. We've got a series of bits put together, many of which are eclectic picks easily traceable - Sunbáti for instance), but without any identifiable guideline. No theme, no structure. A typical symptom of this approach is the conclusion that went unnoticed for the audience who had to wait some extra-musical signe indicated to them that that was it!
For the sake ofcomparison and for a relatively extensive debate, I suggest you listen tothis one here (http://www.zamanalwasl.net/forums/showthread.php?p=3518#post3518) and read the narrative of the thread in the context of which it was uploaded.

Franck Leriche
01-07-2011, 08:12
No theme, no structure. A typical symptom of this approach is the conclusion that went unnoticed for the audience who had to wait some extra-musical signe indicated to them that that was it!


That's precisely what i like. To my hears his playing is more like discovering a new town, let say Istanbul, you may walk a long time without seeing really nothing, and suddenly you're in front a one of the most beautiful jewel of the architecture.
And i don't need to have an official ending neither to feel like i've spend some good time.

To my hears he is very close to the essence of the taqsim.